Classes

Each character in this phrase contributes to a part of the definition, which makes it very easy for you to learn! If we break it down, we can see that 火 (fire), 山 (mountain) and 口 (mouth) combine to literally mean “fire mountain’s mouth”, or “mouth of the fire mountain”. 火山 means volcano, and the mouth of the volcano is the crater at the top of the mountain where lava erupts! So, it’s very logical that the phrase 火山口 translates to the English word “crater”. Note that this only refers to volcanic craters, and not craters made from asteroids or other objects.


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“Fire Mountain” sounds like a dangerous video game level, but actually it’s just the literal translation of this phrase’s building blocks: 火(fire) and 山 (mountain). Sometimes I’m a little worried about the fact that the ground beneath my feet is part of a constantly moving set of tectonic plates resting on a bed of magma, which is constantly looking for a way to escape to the surface! Yikes!


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This is an easy one: burning hot (炎) + sun (日) is a 'burning sun'. Of course!


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‘Burning hot' (炎) times 2 = ‘blazing'!


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The phrase for Flames of Fire (焱焱) is comprised of Flames (焱) + Flames (焱) = Flames of Fire


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Burning + woods = burning the woods. This is REALLY straightforward. In Chinese, woods (two trees) and forest (three trees) are almost interchangeable. But there is a general sense that 'forest' tends to be larger.


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