Classes

‘Burning hot' (炎) times 2 = ‘blazing'!


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The phrase for Flames of Fire (焱焱) is comprised of Flames (焱) + Flames (焱) = Flames of Fire


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Burning + woods = burning the woods. This is REALLY straightforward. In Chinese, woods (two trees) and forest (three trees) are almost interchangeable. But there is a general sense that 'forest' tends to be larger.


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This compound contains two copies of the building block character 山 (mountain). Usually, when we double down on a character, it adds emphasis. In this case, 出 implies a far distance, more than one mountain away. In ancient China, political opponents of the Emperor were often exiled, and this compound represents that distant place they were banished to. In modern Chinese, the compound means “to get out” or “exit”.


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This phrase contains the compound 出 (to get out) and the building block 口 (mouth). You can imagine someone telling you to get out! If you travel to China or Taiwan, you’ll see this phrase everywhere; it’s used in public areas to show people where the exit is. Often you’ll even see it accompanied with an English translation: “exit”.


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Person (人) plus person (人), we have ‘everyone’!


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